Bookmarks for July 23rd through August 11th

These are my links for July 23rd through August 11th:

  • An Internet-Ready OS From Scratch in a Week — Rump Kernels on Bare Metal (NetBSD Blog) – An alternative approach to building a custom OS for running an application as a service. Unlike the MirageOS/Unikernel approach this solution doesn’t require applications be written specifically for the minimal OS. That is, thanks to the NetBSD userspace libraries and libc, one can take an existing POSIX application (such as the httpd in mentioned in the article) and run it on a purpose built OS. No need for a general purpose OS and all of their potential attack vectors.
  • Unikernels: Rise of the Virtual Library Operating System – ACM Queue – An overview of the MirageOS unikernel project, which focuses on providing a customised operating system for single-purpose appliances running on a hypervisor. That is an OS purpose-built from a library of components the result of which includes only the functionality required for the target appliance rather than, say, running a full general-purpose OS with a multitude of supporting daemons/services in order to host a database. This seems like really interesting research into how to provide safer, more efficient, operating systems for the cloud. It also has the (noted) advantage of being one of few research OS’s that doesn’t require an everlasting supply of students to write device drivers for new hardware. As MirageOS runs on the Xen hypervisor the only drivers required are those for the virtual devices Xen exposes.

I wrote about about why these posts are being generated here: Sharing Links.

Bookmarks for July 18th – Special Remote Worker edition

These are my links for July 18th, a special edition about remote working:

  • Being a Remote Worker Sucks – Long Live the Remote Worker – Scott Hanselman – Scott Hanselman writes well on the pros and cons of being a remote worker and gives some tips on how to improve the situation.

    Having been a 100% remote worker for about the past 13months (barring monthly office visits for the first 9 months or so of that) I agree with pretty much everything in here, especially the items about status and team building.

    I have no experience with the ‘do be seen’ item, but each team I’ve worked on in the 13 months I have been remote have had a sufficient text chat solution that I feel pretty decently connected to folks most of the time.

    The item on ‘find a place to be productive’ is good advice, but don’t read it as mandatory that you need a place other than your desk at home. I have worked in coffee shops and libraries on a couple of occasions, but only out of necessity. I’m a creature comforts and familiarity kind of guy so am 100% happy and feel at my most productive when working from my little study/office room.

  • Scott Hanselman – 30 Tips for Successful Communication as a Remote Worker – Some communication tips for remote workers from remote workers at Microsoft.

    This is all good stuff, at least in spirit (it is, perhaps obviously, Microsoft tech centric) and matches pretty well to the list of things I came up with whilst working remote for a large corporation.

    Now that I’m in a smaller team with a majority of remote workers some of this stuff is less relevant to my current situation, but all of it is worth bearing in mind for remote workers.

I wrote about about why these posts are being generated here: Sharing Links.

Bookmarks for May 16th through June 27th

These are my links for May 16th through June 27th:

  • The Fermi Paradox – Wait But Why – Good overview of the Fermi Paradox, "So where is everybody?", and some of the possible explanations.
  • cabel.name: Coda Toolbar and the Three Pixel Conundrum – This is a fine example of the sort of thing that drives me crazy when doing user interface development. You can spend hours, days, weeks fighting the toolkit to tweak a pixel (or in this instance 3). I can't deny that the end results usually look lovely, but I'm happy to leave the toolkit battling (and inevitable reimplementation of a standard toolkit widget) to someone else.
  • To Wash It All Away (PDF) – James Mickens has written a series of amusing columns for USENIX's online magazine. This one on web development resonated the most with me – I have a strong dislike for web development and JavaScript. I was going to include a few quotes here but it really deserves to be read in its entirety.

I wrote about about why these posts are being generated here: Sharing Links.